Art Deco Handel Lamp

$0.00

SOLD

Extremely rare art deco Handel lamp. Leaded with textured glass panels. This lamp is signed and numbered 7568. In the Hibel and Fontaine Handel book, page 134, you can view other art deco lamps that have this base. The lamp is in perfect condition and highly collectible. The diameter is 19.5′ and is 23″ tall. Will supply more pictures upon request.

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Description

Why are Mosaic lamps that were made during the turn of the century so valuable? (Duffner & Kimberly, Suess Ornamental, Wilkinson, Handel, Unique Art Glass, Whaley, Chicago Mosaic Lamp Co. The answer is divided into three categories:

1) The transition from gas and oil to electricity lent itself to creating marvelous innovative designs. 2) The excellent workmanship of that period 3) The financial Panic of 1907 that bankrupted the mosaic lamp companies. Therefore, these companies were in business only for a short period of time. (I have elaborated on the causes of that crisis).

Why are Mosaic lamps that were made during the turn of the century so valuable? (Duffner & Kimberly, Suess Ornamental, Wilkinson, Handel, Unique Art Glass, Whaley, Chicago Mosaic Lamp Co. The answer is divided into three categories:

1) The transition from gas and oil to electricity lent itself to creating marvelous innovative designs. 2) The excellent workmanship of that period 3) The financial Panic of 1907 that bankrupted the mosaic lamp companies. Therefore, these companies were in business only for a short period of time. (I have elaborated on the causes of that crisis).

What was the Panic of 1907, and what caused it? The Panic of 1907 was a six-week stretch of runs on banks in New York City and other American cities in October and early November of 1907. It was triggered by a failed speculation that caused the bankruptcy of two brokerage firms. But the shock that set in motion the events to create the Panic was the earthquake in San Francisco in 1906. The devastation of that city drew gold out of the world’s major money centers. This created a liquidity crunch that created a recession starting in June of 1907.

I am actively buying and Selling antique table lamps by the following makers:

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, CT.

The Handel Lamp Company was founded in 1885 when Philip Handel formed a partnership with Adolph Eydam in Meriden, CT. The company experienced great success in making lamps and lighting through the 1920s and into the 1930s when they ceased production in 1936. Handel Lamp Company was known for very high quality and artistic painted shade, metal overlay shades, and panel glass lamps and chandeliers.

Duffner and Kimberly, New York

Duffner and Kimberly, organized in 1905, resulting from the partnership of the creative stained glass window designer Oliver Speers Kimberly and Francis Joseph Duffner. Oliver Kimberly worked for Tiffany in the window department but was transferred to the lamp department. He worked there a short time before he left to enter a partnership with Thomas Calvert (1873-c. 1950), also one of Tiffany’s artists. The Calvert and Kimberly Company lasted until late 1905 when Kimberly entered into this partnership with Francis Joseph Duffner. Frank Duffner worked for Bradley and Hubbard and a number of other concerns in the Northeast. Duffner and Kimberly made primarily high-quality leaded lamps that were on a par with the production from Tiffany Studios. Due to various factors, Duffner & Kimberly was forced to file for bankruptcy on April 13, 1911.

Wilkinson Lamp Company

The Wilkinson Company was incorporated in 1907 in Brooklyn, NY. The founder of the company, Elmer Wilkinson, had been trained as a clockmaker and made elaborate clock cases before venturing into art glass lighting in 1909. The Wilkinson Co. was only in business for six years before succumbing to bankruptcy in 1915. During the time the Wilkinson Co. was in business, they became known for their exquisitely designed bases and shades. The Wilkinson Company also did not frequently sign their pieces. Occasionally a base will bear a mark that says, “WILKINSON CO. BROOKLYN, N.Y.,” but the lampshades are generally not signed. Instead, many Wilkinson lamps are identified as such by their heat cap and ring assemblies. The Wilkinson Company used a particular locking mechanism to keep the shade firmly attached to the base.

Suess Ornamental Glass Company

“Art in Illumination” is the title of the Suess Ornamental Glass Company’s brochure. Located in Chicago, the firm produced some of the most exotic bases and shades during the golden age of American mosaic lamps. (1906-1912).

Unique Art Glass and Metal Company

The Unique Art Glass and Metal Company was located in Brooklyn, New York, around the turn of the 20th century. They were one of the first companies to venture into the copper foil mosaic lamp business immediately after Tiffany’s patent expired in 1903. They catered to the newly emerging middle class without sacrificing quality. Besides Tiffany, Unique was probably the most financially successful of all the mosaic lamp firms until they too succumbed to the financial downturn the country experienced from 1907 on.